Fluids and Transfers

Fluids and Transfers - © Dimitri Lague

The theme of Fluids and transfers is divided into two parts. The first deals with the dynamics of complex systems coupling fluids and energy transfers in a heterogeneous environment.
 
For example, this involves evaluating energy storage capacities in crystalline basements in a single-well geothermal configuration. This question is addressed within the framework of ANR’s Stock-en-socle project and industrial collaborations with BRGM and ANTEA. The questions explore the accessible volume depending on the fracturing and are approached via in situ experimentation using optical fibers and 3D modeling.
 
Very similar issues are addressed under ANR’s Diaphane project, but in the context of understanding heat transfers in a hydrothermal system in collaboration with IRISA and IPR. This involves improving the interpretation of the temperature signal contained in fumaroles to detect shifts towards a catastrophic regime. (These 2 projects illustrate the synergies that develop around common scientific questions).
 

 

Fluids and Transfers - © Dimitri Lague

The second part deals with sedimentary transport and morphodynamic instabilities; the Institute of Physics Rennes (IPR) is also highly involved in this topic.
 
We tackle the question of coupling between vegetation and sedimentary transfers, via terrestrial LiDAR data and very high resolution digital modeling as in this example. The goal is also to address, in the longer term, the impact of geomorphology on ecosystem dynamics in collaboration with the ECOBIO colleagues.
 
A second aspect concerns the study of the role of natural heterogeneity in fluvial morphodynamics, and specifically the importance of granulometric polydispersity and bedrock fracturing for fluvial incision problems.
 
A final aspect concerns the impact of the seismic cycle on sediment transfers addressed within ANR’s EROQUAKE project. We address the topographic assessment of major earthquakes and the characteristic timescale for sediment export.